Register | Login

Build . Learn . Connect . Share . Keep in touch

Home

Search

Blog

Wiki

About





Home Page

>

Wiki

>

Nigerian Tribes

Nigerian Tribes
The ethnicity of Nigeria is so varied.

Abayon

Cross River

Abua (Odual)

Rivers

Achipa (Achipawa)

Kebbi

Adim

Cross River

Adun

Cross River

Affade

Yobe

Afizere

Plateau

Afo

Plateau

Agbo

Cross River

Akaju-Ndem

Cross River

Akweya-Yachi

Benue

Alago (Arago)

Piateau

Amo

Plateau

Anaguta

Plateau

Anang (Anaang, Annang)

The Anaang (also spelled Annang) is a cultural and ethnic group that lives in Southeastern Nigeria. At present, the Anaangs have eight local government areas of the present thirty-one local government areas in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria (Akwa Ibom State Local Government Areas), namely Abak, Essien Udim, Etim Ekpo, Ika, Ikot Ekpene, Obot Akara, Oruk Anam and Ukanafun in the Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria. They were formerly located in the former Abak and Ikot Ekpene Divisions of the Anaang Province, in the former Eastern Region of Nigeria.The proper name for the Ika of Akwa Ibom is Ika-Annang.

Akwa lbom

Andoni (Obolo)

The Andoni people of Rivers State, of Nigeria, are a part of the Ijaw tribe and are also considered as a distinct ethnolinguistic group by others, and a people closely related to the Annang, Igbo, Ibibio and Efik people of Akwa Ibom State and Cross River State in Nigeria. Like these people, the Andoni people refer to God as Awaji or Owaji.

Akwa lbom
Rivers

Angas

Bauchi
Jigawa
Plateau

Ankwei

Plateau

Anyima

Cross River

Attakar (ataka)

Kaduna

Auyoka (Auyokawa)

Jigawa

Awori

Lagos
Ogun

Ayu

Kaduna

Babur

Adamawa
Bomo
Taraba
Yobe

Bachama

Adamawa

Bachere

Cross River

Bada

Plateau

Bade

Yobe

Bahumono

Cross River

Bakulung

Taraba

Bali

Taraba

Bambora (Bambarawa)

Bauchi

Bambuko

Taraba

Banda (Bandawa)

Taraba

Banka (Bankalawa)

Bauchi

Banso (Panso)

Adamawa

Bara (Barawa, Kotoko, Mser, Moria, Makari)

The Kotoko people , also called Mser, Moria, Bara and Makari, are an ethnic group located in northern Cameroon, Chad and Nigeria. The Kotoko population is composed of 49,071 people, the majority of which, 40,904 people live in Cameroon. The Kotoko form part of the Chadic people. The mother tongue is Lagwan - (kot). Most of Kotoko are Sunni Muslims, other sects like Ibadhi, Ahmadi, Alevi, Yazidi, Druze and Khariji. Only slightly more than 10% of the population is Evangelical. They founded the Kotoko kingdom in the 15th century.

Bauchi

Barke

Bauchi

Baruba (Barba)

Niger

Bashiri (Bashirawa)

Plateau

Bassa

Kaduna
Kogi
Niger
Plateau

Batta

Adamawa

Baushi

Niger

Baya

Adamawa

Bekwarra

Cross River

Bele (Buli Belewa)

Bauchi

Betso (Bete)

Taraba

Bette

Cross River

Bilei

Adamawa

Bille (Bile, Bili)

The Bille Tribe (Bile, Bili) of the Ijaw people lives in central Rivers State, Nigeria. The small clan is sometimes classified as a Kalabari clan rather than as its own tribe. The tribal seat is the town of Bille.

Adamawa
Rivers

Bina (Binawa)

Kaduna

Bini

Edo or Bini is the name for the place, people and language of an ethnic group in Nigeria. Other Edo-speaking ethnic groups include the Esan, the Afemai, the Isoko, the Urhobo among others. Also referred to as Bini or Benin ethnic group though currently the people prefer to be simply called Edo, the Edo are the descendants of the people who founded the Benin Empire, which is located in South/Mid-Western Nigeria now called Edo State.

Edo

Birom (Berom)

The Berom (sometimes also spelt as Birom) people are an indigenous ethnic group of the Jos Plateau in Nigeria. Within Plateau State, they are concentrated mostly in the local government areas of, Jos South, Jos North, Barkin Ladi (Gwol), and Riyom. They speak the Berom language, which belongs to the large Niger-Congo family of languages. It is not related to the Hausa language (which belongs to the Afro-Asiatic family) as has sometime been claimed by some Hausas of Northern Nigeria.

Plateau

Bkkos

Plateau

Bobua

Taraba

Boki (Nki)

Cross River

Boko (Bussawa Bargawa)

Niger

Bole (Bolewa)

Bauchi
Yobe

Boma (Bomawa Burmano)

Bauchi

Bomboro

Bauchi

Botlere

Adamawa

Buduma

The Buduma are an ethnic group of Chad, Cameroon, and Nigeria who inhabit many of the islands of Lake Chad. They are predominantly fishers and cattle-herders. In the past, the Buduma carried out violent raids on the cattle herds of their neighbors. They were feared villains with aggressive reputations; thus, they were respected and left alone for many years, protected by their own habitat of water and reeds. Today, they are a peaceful and friendly people willing to adopt some modern changes. Although their neighbors call them Buduma, meaning "people of the grass (or reeds)," they prefer to be called Yedina. Their language is known as Yedina.

Borno
Niger

Buji

Plateau

Buli

Bauchi

Bunu

Kogi

Bura

Adamawa

Burak

Bauchi

Burma (Burmawa)

Plateau

Buru

Yobe

Buta (Butawa)

Bauchi

Bwall

Plateau

Bwatiye

Adamawa

Bwazza

Adamawa

Challa

Plateau

Chama (Chamawa Fitilai)

Bauchi

Chamba

Taraba

Chamo

Bauchi

Chibok (Chibbak)

Yobe

Chinine

Borno

Chip

Plateau

Chokobo

Plateau

Chukkol

Taraba

Daba

Adamawa

Dadiya

Bauchi

Daka

Adamawa

Dakarkari

Niger
Kebbi

Danda (Dandawa)

Kebbi

Dangsa

Taraba

Daza (Dere Derewa)

Bauchi

Degema

Rivers

Deno (Denawa)

Bauchi

Dghwede

Bomo

Diba

Taraba

Doemak (Dumuk)

Plateau

Duka (Dukawa)

Kebbi

Duma (Dumawa)

Bauchi

Ebana (Ebani)

Rivers

Ebira (Ebirra, Igbira, Igbirra)

The Ebira (also spelt Igbira or Igbirra)These days Ebira is no more pronounced or spelt "Igbira or Igbirra" because it is considered to be insultive to most of the Ebiras but then, and also, "Ebira" is mostly pronounced as "Igbira or Igbirra" by most people from the western part of Nigeria. Ebira people are an ethno-linguistic group of Nigeria. Many Ebira people are from Kogi State, Kwara State, Nasarawa State, Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, and Edo State. Okene is said to be the administrative centre of the Ebira-speaking people in Kogi state, not far from the Niger-Benue confluence.

Edo
Kogi
Ondo

Ebu

Edo
Kogi

Efik

The Efik are an ethnic group located in the Southern part of Cross River State, Nigeria. The Efik migrated down the Cross River from Cameroon in the 16th century and founded numerous settlements in the Calabar area in present-day Cross River State. Calabar is not to be confused with the Kalabari Kingdom in Rivers State which is an Ijaw state to its west. Cross River State was formerly one of the original twelve states of Nigeria known as the Southeastern State.

Cross River

Egbema

Rivers

Egede (lgedde)

Benue

Eggon

Plateau

Egun (Gu)

Lagos
Ogun

Ekajuk

Cross River

Eket

Eket is the second largest city in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. The name also refers to the indigenous ethnic group of the region and to their language. The city itself, an industrial city that in recent years has become a conurbation engulfing separate villages, has a population of over 200,000, while entire urban area, which covers Nsit Ubium, Afaha Eket and Esit Eket, has a combined population of 364,489, the second largest urban population in Akwa Ibom state.

Akwa Ibom

Ekoi (Ejagham)

Ekoi people, also known as Ejagham, are an ethnic group in the extreme southeast of Nigeria and extending eastward into Northern Cameroon. Ekoid Bantu languages are spoken by many groups, including the Atam, Boki, Mbembe, Ufia, and Yako. The Ekoi are related to the Efik, Annang and Ibibio people of southeastern Nigeria and have lived closely with them and also claim to have migrated from the Cameroons to their area. The inhabitants of Kwa, located near Calabar, claim to be the first Ekoi people to have migrated from the Cameroons. The Ekoi are best known for their Ekpe headdresses.

Cross River

Ekpeye

The Ekpeye are a people in southeastern Nigeria with a distinct culture and rulers of a former kingdom. The Ekpeye are usually included as a subgroup of the Igbo people on linguistic and cultural grounds. They speak an Igboid language. Ekpeye people living in the Ahoada (Ahuda) and Ogba-Egbema areas of Rivers State in Nigeria were a population of 80,000 (1991 census), that has increased 63% to approximately 130,000, according to the 2006 census estimates.

Rivers

Eleme

The Eleme are one of the various groups of indigenous peoples that inhabit the Niger Delta region of Southeast. The Eleme live in ten village-clusters situated in Eleme Local Government Area (ELGA), Rivers State, around 20 km east of Port Harcourt. The total territory occupied by the Eleme people expands across approximately 140 square kilometres. Eleme is bounded in the north by Obio akpor and Oyigbo, in the South by Okrika and Ogu bolo, in the east by Tai and the West by Okrika and Port Harcourt.

Rivers

Engenni (Ngene, Egeni)

The Engenni people (Egeni) are considered by themselves and some to be an Ijaw clan and by others (mainly academics) to be a branch of the Edo (Bini) ethnic group. They primarily live in Ahoada West Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. Although they consider themselves to be Ijaw, the Engenni speak an Edoid language. The Engenni have close relations with neighboring Ijaw tribes such as the Zarama and Epie-Atissa.

Rivers

Epie

Rivers

Esan (Ishan)

The Esan people are a major ethnic group in Southwestern Nigeria, mainly in what is now the Edo Central Senatorial District, in Edo State. The Esan people live primarily in Esanland, a modern term for the 35 kingdoms or clans making up the Esan people: Irrua, Ekpoma, Uromi, Ubiaja, Egoro, Ekpon, Ewohimi, Emu, Ewatto, Ewossa, Amalu, Igueben, Idoa, Illushi, Ifeku, Iyenlen, Ohordua, Okhuesan, Oria, Onogholo, Orowa, Opoji, Ogwa, Okalo, Ebelle, Ewu, Ugboha, Uroh, Uzea, Udo, Urohi, Ojiogba, Ugun, Ugbegun, and Ukhun. Esanland is situated just north of the Niger Delta and about sixty-five kilometers north-east of the state capital, Benin City. Esanland is also west of the Niger River.

Edo

Etche (Echie)

Etche is a Local Government Area (LGA) in Rivers State, Nigeria, named after the Etche (Echie) people of Southern Nigeria. The Etche are a sub-group of the Igbo people and they speak a dialect of the Igbo language. They also inhabit Omuma LGA; Etche/Omuma is a National Assembly constituency.

Rivers

Etolu (Etilo)

Benue

Etsako (Afemai, Afenmai, Estakor, Iyekhee, Yekhee, Ivbiosakon)

The Afemai people, also spelled Afenmai are a group of people living in the northern part of Edo State south geopolitical zone of Nigeria. Afemai people occupy six local government areas of Edo state: Etsako West, with headquarters in Auchi, Etsako Central, Etsako East, Owan East, Owan West and Akoko Edo. These make up the Edo-North Senatorial District.

Edo

Etung

Cross River

Etuno

Edo

Fulani (Fula, Fulbe)

The Fula people or Fulani or Fulbe are one of the largest ethnolinguistic groups in Africa, numbering approximately 40 million people in total. They are one of the most widely dispersed and culturally diverse of the peoples of Africa. The Fulani are bound together by the common language of Fulfulde, as well as by some basic elements of Fulbe culture, such as The pulaaku , a code of conduct common to all Fulani groups.

Katsina
Sokoto
Kebbi
Bauchi
Yobe
Gombe

Fyam (Fyem)

Plateau

Fyer(Fer)

Plateau

Ga'anda

Adamawa

Gade

Niger

Galambi

Bauchi

Gamergu-Mulgwa

Bomo

Gavako

Borno

Gbedde

Kogi

Geji

Bauchi

Gengle

Taraba

Gera (Gere or Gerawa)

Bauchi

Geruma (Gerumawa)

Bauchi

Gingwak

Bauchi

Gira

Adamawa

Gizigz

Adamawa

Goemai

Goemai is an Afro-Asiatic (Chadic, West Chadic A) language spoken in the Plateau state of Central Nigeria by approximately 200,000 people. Its speakers refer to themselves and their language as 'Goemai'; in older linguistic, historical and ethnographical literature the term 'Ankwe' has been used to refer to the people. Goemai is a predominantly isolating language with the subject–verb–object constituent order.

Plateau

Gokana (Kana)

Rivers

Gombi

Adamawa

Gonia

Taraba

Gornun (Gmun)

Taraba

Gubi (Gubawa)

Bauchi

Gude

Adamawa

Gudu

Adamawa

Gure

Kaduna

Gurmana

Niger

Gururntum

Bauchi

Gusu

Plateau

Gwa (Gurawa)

Adamawa

Gwamba

Adamawa

Gwandara

Kaduna
Niger
Plateau

Gwari (Gbagyi, Gwarri, Gbari)

Gbagyi (also spelled Gwarri and Gbari) are an ethnic group in central Nigeria. They predominantly live in the Niger, Kaduna, States and the Federal Capital Territory. They are also found in Nasarawa and Kogi States in central Nigerian Area.Gbagyi is the most populated ethnic Group and indigenous in the Federal Capital Territory of Nigeria and their major occupation is farming.

Kaduna
Niger
Plateau

Gwom

Taraba

Gwoza (Waha)

Bomo

Gyem

Bauchi

Hausa

The Hausa are the largest ethnic group in West Africa and one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa. The Hausa are a racially diverse but culturally homogeneous people based primarily in the Sahelian and Sudanian areas of northern Nigeria and southeastern Niger, with significant numbers also living in parts of Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Chad, Togo, Ghana, and Sudan.

Bauchi
Borno
Jigawa
Kaduna
Kano
Kastina
Kebbi
Niger
Taraba
Sokoto

Higi (Hig)

Borno
Adamawa

Holma

Adamawa

Hona

Adamawa

Ibani

The Ibani tribe of the Ijaw people lives in southern Rivers State, Nigeria. Bonny Town is the tribal seat. The tribe has a strong central authority structure and a long-established royal lineage. Bonny's development was also shaped by the tribe's close interaction with European traders. The Kingdom of Bonny was a major trading center from the 16th century onwards. The cult of the iguana (ikuba) also features strongly in Bonny cultural traditions. Historically, Bonny frequently engaged in wars against its nearby rivals, such as Elem Kalabari and Andoni.

Rivers

Ibeno

Akwa lbom

Ibibio

The Ibibio are a people of southeastern Nigeria. They are related to the Anaang and the Efik peoples. During colonial period in Nigeria, the Ibibio Union asked for recognition by the British as a sovereign nation (Noah, 1988). The Annang, Efik, Ekid, Oron and Ibeno share personal names, culture, and traditions with the Ibibio, and speak closely related varieties of Ibibio-Efik.

Akwa lbom

Ichen

Adamawa

Idoma

The Idoma are an ethno-linguistic group that primarily inhabit lower in the western areas of Benue State, Nigeria, and kindred groups can be found in Cross Rivers State and Nasarawa State in Nigeria. The Idoma language is classified in the Akweya subgroup of the Idomoid languages of the Volta–Niger family. The Akweya subgroup is closely related to the Yatye-Akpa sub-group. The bulk of the territory is inland, south of river Benue, some seventy-two kilometers east of its confluence with river Niger. The Idoma are known to be warriors' and 'hunters of class, but hospitable and peace loving. The greater part of Idomaland remained largely unknown to the West until the 1920s, leaving much of the colorful traditional culture of the Idoma intact. The population of the Idoma is estimated to be about 3.5 million.

Benue
Taraba

Igalla (Igala)

Igala are an ethnic group of Nigeria. Igala practice a number of different religions, including animism, Christianity, and Islam. The home of the Igala people is situated east of the river Niger and Benue confluence and astride the Niger in Lokoja, Kogi state of Nigeria with its headquarters in Idah. The area is approximately between latitude 6°30 and 8°40 north and longitude 6°30 and 7°40 east and covers an area of about 13,665 square kilometers (Oguagha P.A 1981) The Igala population is estimated at two million, they can also be found in Delta, Anambra and Edo States of Nigeria. The Igala language is closely related to the Yoruba and Itsekiri languages.

Kogi

Igbo (Ibo)

The Igbo people, historically spelled Ibo, are an ethnic group of southeastern Nigeria. They speak Igbo, which includes various Igboid languages and dialects. Igbo people are one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa. In rural Nigeria, Igbo people are mostly craftsmen, farmers and traders. The most important crop is the yam; celebrations are held annually to celebrate its harvesting. Other staple crops include cassava and taro.

Abia
Anambra
Ebonyi
Enugu
Imo
Rivers
Delta
Akwa Ibom
Cross River

Ijaw (Ijo, Izon)

Ijaw (also known by the subgroups "Ijo" or "Izon") are a collection of peoples indigenous mostly to the forest regions of the Bayelsa, Delta, and Rivers States within the Niger Delta in Nigeria. Some are resident in Akwa-Ibom, Edo, and Ondo states also in Nigeria. Many are found as migrant fishermen in camps as far west as Sierra Leone and as far east as Gabon along the Western Africa coastline.

Bayelsa
Delta
Rivers

Ikorn

Cross River

Ikwerre (Ikwere)

The Ikwerre (also spelt Ikwere) are one of the many ethnic groups in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. They are generally considered a subgroup of the Igbo people of southeastern Nigeria, although a small minority for political expediency now dispute this account, claiming their history was rewritten during the colonial period because of the dominance of the larger Igbo group. The Ikwerre are said to be related or share common ancestry with the Ogba and Ekpeye people (Akalaka brothers). They trace their origins to Benin and elsewhere. They constitute the majority of Rivers state, Nigeria, although there are other populations in neighboring states. The Ikwerre speak the Ikwerre dialect, a dialect part of the many diverse Igbo dialects. They are traditionally farmers, fishermen and hunters, but in recent times, the environmental degradation and urban sprawl associated with oil exploration and exploitation has caused a sharp decline in the amount of farmland, forests and rivers available for their traditional occupations.

Rivers

Irigwe

Plateau

Isoko

Isoko people are an ethnolinguistic group that inhabits the Isoko region of Delta State, Nigeria.

Delta
Edo

Jaba

Kaduna

Jahuna (Jahunawa)

Taraba

Jaku

Bauchi

Jara (Jaar Jarawa Jarawa-Dutse)

Bauchi

Jere (Jare Jera Jera Jerawa)

Bauchi
Plateau

Jero

Taraba

Jibu

Adamawa

Jidda-Abu

Plateau

Jimbin (Jimbinawa)

Bauchi

Jirai

Adamawa

Jonjo (Jenjo)

Taraba

Jukun

Jukun are an ethno-linguistic group or ethnic nation in West Africa. The Jukun are traditionally located in Taraba, Benue, Nassarawa, Plateau, Adamawa, and Gombe states in Nigeria and parts of northwestern Cameroon. They are descendants of the people of the Kwararafa kingdom. Most of the tribes in the north central of Nigeria trace their origin to the Jukun people and are related in one way or the other to the Jukuns. If not for the coming of both Christianity and Islam the Jukun people were traditionalists. Most of the tribes, Alago, Agatu, Rendere, gumai in Shendam, and others left Kwararafa when it disintegrated as a result of a power tussle. The Jukuns are divided into two major groups; the Jukun Wanu and Jukun Wapa. The Jukun Wanu are fishermen residing along the banks of the river Benue and Niger where they run through Taraba state, Benue state and Nasarawa state. The Wukari Federation, headed by the Aku Uka of Wukari, is now the main center of the Jukun people.

Bauchi
Benue
Taraba
Plateau

Kaba(Kabawa)

Taraba

Kadara

Taraba

Kafanchan

Kaduna

Kagoro

Kaduna

Kaje (Kache)

Kaduna

Kajuru (Kajurawa)

Kaduna

Kaka

Adamawa

Kamaku (Kamuku, Karnukawa)

The Kamuku are an ethnic group in central Nigeria. The Kamuku language belongs to the Kainji family and is related to C'lela, Duka, and Kambari. They mainly live in the west-central region of Nigeria, particularly in Kwara State. Their population in 1996 exceeded 35,000 people, found in the Sokoto division of Sokoto State, the Birnin Gwari division of Kaduna State and the Kontagora and Minna divisions of Niger State.

Kaduna
Kebbi
Niger

Kambari

Kebbi
Niger

Kambu

Adamawa

Kamo

Bauchi

Kanakuru (Dera)

Adamawa
Borno

Kanembu

Bomo

Kanikon

Kaduna

Kantana

Plateau

Kanufi

Kaduna
Adamawa
Bomo
Kano
Niger
Jigawa
Plateau
Taraba
Yobe

Kanuri (Kanouri, Kanowri, Yerwa)

The Kanuri people (Kanouri, Kanowri, also Yerwa and several subgroup names) are an African ethnic group living largely in the lands of the former Kanem and Bornu Empires: Bornu state in northeastern Nigeria, southeast Niger, western Chad and northern Cameroon. Those generally termed Kanuri include several subgroups and dialect groups, some of whom feel themselves distinct from the Kanuri. Most trace their origins to ruling lineages of the medieval Kanem-Bornu Empire, its client states or provinces. In contrast to neighboring Toubou or Zaghawa pastoralists, Kanuri groups have traditionally been sedentary, engaging in farming, fishing the Lake Chad basin, and engaged in trade and salt processing.

Borno

Karekare (Karaikarai)

Bauchi
Yobe

Karimjo

Taraba

Kariya

Bauchi

Katab (Kataf, Atyap)

The Atyap people, also known as the Kataf by the Hausa people, are an ethnic group that occupy part of the Zangon-Kataf Local Government Area of Kaduna State, Nigeria. They speak the Tyap language, one of the West Plateau languages.

Kaduna

Kenern (Koenoem)

Plateau

Kenton

Taraba

Kiballo (Kiwollo)

Kaduna

Kilba

The Kilba are an ethnic group in the Hong local government area of Adamawa State (formerly Gongola State) in Nigeria. They are an integrated union of many kin-ethnic dialects like the Bura, Babbir, Marghi, Chibback, Hona, Holma, Higgi, Batta, Mbula, Nzanyi, Fali, Ihhi, Kopre and even Kanuri (from Borno State). All these ethnic groups were melted and assimilated into what was an original linguistic stock known as 'Höba' or 'Kilba', believed to have been the earliest linguistic group that migrated from the North East of Africa into the hilly lands of the present Kilba area in Nigeria. This ethnic group of the twin names came by the present name Kilba, most likely from the error of mispronunciation by their Fulani neighbors and the subsequent codification of this error by the British colonial officials in the district.

Adamawa

Kirfi (Kirfawa)

Bauchi

Kofyar

The Kofyar are a population in central Nigeria numbering around 50,000. After several anthropological studies, they provide good illustrations of how colonial authorities become unwittingly enmeshed in local politics; of sustainable subsistence agricultural production in crowded areas; of successful self-directed development of market-oriented agriculture; and of the use of "traditional" cultural resources to prosper in modern Nigeria.

Benue
Plateau

Koma

Taraba

Kona

Taraba

Koro (Kwaro)

Kaduna
Niger

Kubi (Kubawa)

Bauchi

Kudachano (Kudawa)

Bauchi

Kugama

Taraba

Kula

The Kula tribe of the Ijaw people lives in Akuku Toru Local Government Area, southwestern Rivers State, Nigeria. The small Kalabari-speaking tribe is sometimes classified as a Kalabari community rather than as its own tribe. The tribal seat is the town of Kula (also known as Anyame-Kula or Anyaminama-Kula founded and established by King Sara 1).

Rivers

Kulere (Kaler)

Plateau

Kunini

Taraba

Kurama

Jigawa
Kaduna
Niger
Plateau

Kurdul

Adamawa

Kushi

Bauchi

Kuteb (Kutep)

The Kuteb (or Kutep) people are an ethno-linguistic group in West Africa, who speak a Jukunoid language. Most of the Kuteb live in Taraba State, Nigeria. Recently they have been involved in violent confrontations with other ethnic groups in which many people have been killed or forced to move.

Taraba

Kutin

Taraba

Kwalla

Plateau

Kwami (Kwom)

Bauchi

Kwanchi

Taraba

Kwanka (Kwankwa)

Bauchi
Plateau

Kwaro

Plateau

Kwato

Plateau

Kyenga (Kengawa)

Sokoto

Laaru (Larawa)

Niger

Lakka

Adamawa

Lala

Adamawa

Lama

Taraba

Lamja

Taraba

Lau

Taraba

lgbo

Abia
Anambra
Benue
Delta
Ebonyi
Enugu
Imo
Rivers

Limono

Bauchi
Plateau

ljumu

Kogi

Longuda (Lunguda)

The Longuda are a West African ethnic group living in Adamawa and Gombe States in northeastern Nigeria. They are the only known matriarchal tribe in Nigeria. The Longuda consider matrilineal descent in many aspects of their social organisation more important than the patrilineal descent. Clan membership may even be counted on the mother line. This custom is not found with their other neighbors or in other tribes of Nigeria. The Longuda language is a branch of Adamawa.

Adamawa
Bauchi
Gombe

Lopa (Lupa Lopawa)

Niger

lsekiri (Itsekiri, Itsekri, Ishekiri, Itsekhiri)

The Itsekiri' (also called the, Isekiri, Itsekri or Ishekiri or Itsekhiri) are an ethnic group of Nigeria's Niger Delta area, Delta State. The Itsekiri presently number under a million people and live mainly in the Warri South, Warri North and Warri South West local government districts of Delta State on the Atlantic Coast of Nigeria. Significant communities of Itsekiris can be found in parts of Edo and Ondo states and in various other Nigerian cities including Lagos, Sapele, Benin City, Port Harcourt and Abuja. Many people of Itsekiri descent also reside in the United Kingdom, the USA and Canada.

Delta

lyala (lyalla)

Cross River

lzondjo

Bayelsa
Delta
Ondo
Rivers

Mabo

Plateau

Mada

Kaduna
Plateau

Mama

Plateau

Mambilla

Adamawa

Manchok

Kaduna

Mandara (Wandala)

Bomo

Manga (Mangawa)

Yobe

Margi (Marghi)

Adamawa
Bomo

Matakam (Mafa)

The Mafa, also called Matakam, are an ethnic group localized in northern Cameroon and eastern Nigeria. According to Lavergne, the Mafa are split into two tribal sections, being the ‘Mafa proper’ (referred to as Maf-Mafa or ‘Mafahai’), and the ‘Bulahai’. The Mafas live in the central part of the Northern Mandaras, which is a region formed by the North area of the Mokolo Plateau and the mountains of northern Mokolo. The Mafa society is divided into several cantons: Moskota; Koza; Gaboua (Koza district); and Matakam-Sud (Mokolo arrondissement). There are also about 1,000 Mafa in Kughum, Gwoza, Nigeria. Total population estimates vary between 82,100 and 150,000. Hallaire indicates that population density in the area is between 99 and 140 inhabitants per square kilometer.

Adamawa

Mbembe

Cross River
Enugu

Mbol

Adamawa

Mbube

Cross River

Mbula

Adamawa

Mbum

Taraba

Memyang (Meryan)

Plateau

Miango

Plateau

Miligili (Migili)

Plateau

Miya (Miyawa)

Bauchi

Mobber

Bomo

Montol

Plateau

Moruwa (Moro'a Morwa)

Kaduna

Muchaila

Adamawa

Mumuye

The Mumuyes are a people of Nigeria. They speak the Mumuye language. The Mumuyes constitute the largest tribal group in Taraba State of Nigeria and form the predominant tribes found in Zing, Yorro, Jalingo, Ardo-Kola, Lau, Gassol, Bali and Gashaka, all of which are local government areas of the state. Mumuyes are also widely found in many parts of the neighboring Adamawa State.

Taraba

Mundang

Adamawa

Munga (Mupang)

Plateau

Mushere

Plateau

Mwahavul (Mwaghavul)

Plateau

Ndoro

Taraba

Ngamo

Bauchi
Yobe

Ngizim

Yobe

Ngweshe (Ndhang.Ngoshe-Ndhang)

Adamawa
Borno

Ningi (Ningawa)

Bauchi

Ninzam (Ninzo)

Kaduna
Plateau

Njayi

Adamawa

Nkim

Cross River

Nkoro

The small Nkoro tribe of the Ijaw people lives in southeastern Rivers State, Nigeria. Nkoro settlements include: Nkoro, Ayama, Dema, The cultural traditions have been influenced by its proximity to the Andoni, the Ogoni, and the Ndoki Igbo. The Nkoro dialect is primarily Ijaw-based, but has some Igbo influences. One section of Nkoro town, Afakani, speaks an entirely different dialect from the rest of the clan. The clan sometimes refers to itself as Kala-Kirika ("Little Okrika"), reflecting the widely held belief that the clan was established by migrants from Okrika. Historically, the Nkoro waged war with the Ogoni. Eventually, however, a truce was negotiated and a market was established at Inyaba where the Nkoro could exchange fish for Ogoni farm goods. Wars were also fought against the Bonny and Andoni tribes.

Rivers

Nkoroo

The Nkoroo people are an Ijaw people living in Nkoroo, Rivers State, Nigeria, numbering about 4,700 (1989). The Nkoroo live in a close relationship with the Defaka, with both groups living in the same town (Nkoro town). They speak their own language, called Nkoroo. The Nkoroo people refer to themselves and their language as 'Kirika', though 'Nkoroo' is the standard name used by outsiders and in the scholarly literature.

Rivers

Nkum

Cross River

Nokere (Nakere)

Plateau

Nunku

Kaduna
Plateau

Nupe (Tapa)

The Nupe, traditionally called the Tapa by the neighbouring Yoruba, are an ethnic group located primarily in the Middle Belt and northern Nigeria, and are the dominant group in Niger State and an important minority in Kwara State.

Niger
Kwara

Nyandang

Taraba

Ododop

Cross River

Ogba

Ogba, also called the Ogba people, is a Tribe in Rivers State, Nigeria originating from the Ancient Benin Empire. They are located within the south-south area in Nigeria. They speak the Ogba language.

Rivers

Ogoni

The Ogoni Kingdom (also known as the Ogonis) are one of the many indigenous peoples in the region of southeast Nigeria. They share common oil-related environmental problems with the Ijaw people of Niger Delta, but Ogonis are not listed in the list of people historically belonging to Niger Delta. They number about 1.5 million people and live in a 404-square-mile (1,050 km2) homeland which they also refer to as Ogoni, or Ogoniland.

Rivers

Ogori

Kwara

Okobo (Okkobor)

Akwa lbom

Okpamheri

Edo

Olulumo

Cross River

Opobo

Opobo is a city-state in the southern region of Nigeria. The state was founded in 1870. A greater part of the city state is still referred to as Opobo in Rivers State and is made up of several Islands and communities, mainly Opobo Town, Queenstown, Kalaibiama, and Epellema while a part of the city state is now in Akwa Ibom State, made up of Ikot Abasi, Kampa.

Rivers

Oron

Akwa lbom

Ouguri

Bauchi

Owan

Edo

Owe

Kwara

Oworo

Kwara

Pa'a (Pa'awa Afawa)

Bauchi

Pai

Plateau

Palli

Adamawa

Panyam

Taraba

Pero

Bauchi

Pire

Adamawa

Pkanzom

Taraba

Polchi Habe

Bauchi

Poll

Taraba

Pongo (Pongu)

Niger

Potopo

Taraba

Pulani (Pulbe)

Bauchi
Borno
Jigawa
Kaduna
Kano
Katsina
Kebbi
Niger
Sokoto
Taraba
Yobe

Pyapun (Piapung)

Plateau

Qanawuri

Plateau

Qua

Cross River

Rebina (Rebinawa)

Bauchi

Reshe

Kebbi
Niger

Rindire (Rendre)

Plateau

Rishuwa

Kaduna

Ron

Piateau

Rubu

Niger

Rukuba

Plateau

Rumada

Kaduna

Rumaya

Kaduna

Sakbe

Taraba

Sanga

Bauchi

Sate

Taraba

Saya (Sayawa Za'ar)

Bauchi

Segidi (Sigidawa)

Bauchi

Shan-Shan

Plateau

Shanga (Shangawa)

Sokoto

Shangawa (Shangau)

Plateau

Shira (Shirawa)

Kano

Shomo

Taraba

Shuwa

Adamawa
Borno

Sikdi

Plateau

Siri (Sirawa)

Bauchi

Srubu (Surubu)

Kaduna

Sukur

Adamawa

Sura

Plateau

Tangale

Bauchi

Tarok

Tarok are an agrarian society in the hills and on the plains southeast of Plateau State in Nigeria.

Plateau
Taraba

Teme

Adamawa

Tera (Terawa)

Bauchi
Bomo

Teshena (Teshenawa)

Kano

Tigon

Adamawa

Tikar

Taraba

Tiv (Tivi)

Tiv (or Tivi) are an ethno-linguistic group or nation in West Africa. They number over two million individuals in Nigeria and Cameroon. The Tiv language is spoken by about two million people in Nigeria, with a few speakers in Cameroon. Most of the language's Nigerian speakers are found in Benue, Nasarawa and Taraba states of Nigeria. In precolonial times, the Hausa referred to the Tiv as "Munchi", a term not accepted by Tiv people. They depend on agricultural produce for commerce and life.

Benue
Plateau
Taraba

Tula

Bauchi

Tur

Adamawa

Ubbo

Adamawa

Ufia

Benue

Ukelle

Cross River

Ukwani (Kwale)

Delta

Uncinda

Kaduna
Kebbi
Niger
Sokoto

Uneme (Ineme)

Edo

Ura (Ula)

Niger

Urhobo

The Urhobos are people of southern Nigeria, near the northwestern Niger delta. The Urhobo is the major ethnic group in Delta State. Delta State is one of the 36 states of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. The Urhobos speak the Urhobo language. The Urhobo culture is related to several cultures in the Niger-Delta - Isoko are related in language and culture, leading to the missionaries erroneously labelling the Urhobo and Isoko cultural groups as Sobo. This name was strongly rejected by both tribes. The Urhobo nation is made up of twenty two sub-groups, including Okpe the largest of all Urhobo sub-groups. The Urhobos are noted for having their own unique style of speaking Nigerian Pidgin English. Since their language is very demonstrative that translates into their style of speaking English and Pidgin English. As a result of their unique language style, their names are also unique. An example of a unique Urhobo name would be the name Onaodowan, belonging to the Onaodowan family from Warri and the Onomakpome, belonging to the Onomakpome family from Sapele.

Delta

Utonkong

Benue

Uyanga

Cross River

Vemgo

Adamawa

Verre

Adamawa

Vommi

Taraba

Wagga

Adamawa

Waja

Bauchi

Waka

Taraba

Warja (Warja)

Jigawa

Warji

Bauchi

Wula

Adamawa

Wurbo

Adamawa

Wurkun

Taraba

Yache

Cross River

Yagba

Kwara

Yakurr (Yako)

Cross River

Yalla

Benue

Yandang

Taraba

Yergan (Yergum)

Plateau

Yoruba

The Yoruba people are an ethnic group of southwestern Nigeria and southern Benin in West Africa. The Yorùbá constitute over 35 million people in total; the majority of this population is from Nigeria and make up 21% of its population, according to the CIA World Factbook, making them one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa. The majority of the Yoruba speak the Yoruba language which is a tonal Niger-Congo language.

Kwara
Lagos
Ogun
Ondo
Oyo
Osun
Ekiti
Kogi

Yott

Taraba

Yumu

Niger

Yungur

Adamawa

Yuom

Plateau

Zabara

Niger

Zaranda

Bauchi

Zarma (Zarmawa, Djerma, Zerma, Dyerma, Zabarma)

The Zarma people (var. Djerma, Zerma, Dyerma, or Zabarma), are a people of westernmost Niger and adjacent areas of Burkina Faso, Benin, Ghana and Nigeria. The Zarma language is one of the Songhai languages, a branch of the Nilo-Saharan language family. Because of the common language and culture, they are sometimes referred to as "Zarma Songhay" (also spelled "Djerma-Songhai"). Zarma actually constitute several dozen smaller ethnic groups, who were either indigenous to the era prior to the Songhai Empire and have assimilated into the Zarma people, or else are people of Zarma origins who have differentiated themselves some time in the precolonial period (through dialect, political structure, or religion). Groups usually referred to as part of the Zarma or Songhay, but who have traceable historical distinctions include the Gabda, Kado, Tinga, and Sorko peoples.

Kebbi

Zayam (Zeam)

Bauchi

Zul (Zulawa)

Bauchi

Follow Us on

Follow Us on Facebook

Facebook

Follow Us on Twitter

Twitter

Follow Us on BlackBerry

BlackBerry

Subscribe

Subscribe

LGTNigeria RSS Feeds

RSS Feeds

In Partnership With


Naibac.com


LGTNigeria.com


TrafficChiefNG.com


OilMapNG.com


StreetCredNG.com


DataLabNG.com

FamilyTree
Home Page
More Info
Search Tree
Developers Blog

Company
About Us
Contact Info
Advertise With Us
Job Vacancies
Corporate Affiliates

Community
User Login
User Registration
Forums
Profile Page
Wiki

Support
Customer Support Forum
Disclaimer
FAQs
Developers


making IT easier

Family Tree: Nigeria
Copyright © 2012 HexGEARª.
All rights reserved.